Masaba Masaba (S01) Review: An entertaining, confident and well-executed semi-autobiography.

What makes the show interesting, is its ability to control the tone of the narrative, it is mostly superficial but it knows how to stay in a middle path between not being very frivolous or being very serious.

From vomiting on a model to accidentally texting your boss “Do you think he has Big Dick Energy?”, Netflix’s new show, Masaba Masaba in a semi-autobiographical manner finds its heart in the most outlandish situations possible. It is like a drama that might cross some limits and become over melodramatic but it never becomes inauthentic, it always becomes more humorous and relatable. Masaba Masaba like her protagonist knows how to work on its survival instinct and sharpen its strong points.


At first, the show appears to be on the heels of Shakuntala Devi, where a superstar mother is always trying to keep her independent daughter in a bubble. But, thankfully this arc gets completed within two episodes and then we see how both mother and daughter rise in their separate worlds. Masaba Gupta, a well-known fashion designer, and entrepreneur has recently been separated from her husband. At home with her mother Neena Gupta and housemaid constantly blabbering about different things, she isn’t able to access her ‘creative flow.’ But, slowly we see how she finds a way out of the mess around her. Meanwhile, Neena Gupta is desperate to land a new big role but no one is paying heed to her.


What makes the show interesting, is its ability to control the tone of the narrative, it is mostly superficial but it knows how to stay in a middle path between not being very frivolous or being very serious. Masaba’s life at the surface seems pretty easy, she books exclusive boats for her fashion show, she can date anyone from 99+ DM requests but just like any other human being, she makes terrible mistakes and entangles herself in a big mess.

After divorce, she tries to show she doesn’t need anyone but in the end, we all need someone. In a scene, she is all happy that she has bought her own flat and is finally living an independent life. She sings and dances and repeats” It’s my house, I am gonna party all by myself” but a few moments later she realizes that now she is lonely as well as independent, which is not an optimum life to live at all.


Some cameos play themselves or a highly melodramatic version of themselves but there’s a sense of honesty in every scene. From Kiara Advani to Farah Khan to Shibani Dandekar, everyone plays themselves and seems to be highly confident to roast themselves. As far as the characterization is concerned, the show finds a unique balance in showing both the protagonist and her powerful, elegant mother Neena Gupta. At times, you wanna see more about Neena’s life but Masaba’s life has its fun. Neena Gupta’s presence felt like a double scoop of chocolate. Masaba’s life is quite an entertaining ride alone but with Neena, it becomes more fun.


Performance-wise, there’s a benefit in playing yourself in a show as the authenticity automatically comes with it. So, Masaba Gupta and Neena Gupta both give an electrifying performance. Neil Bhoopalam as tough from outside but sweet from inside wala boss also does a satisfying job. The rest of the supporting cast including a cameo by Gajraj Rao played their short but important roles amazingly. Overall, Masaba Masaba is highly confident and knows how to control the tone of its narrative which alone makes it a good one-time watch. In a scene Masaba’s friend when finding out that Masaba copied her old design and pasted it on a wax strips box, she says “You have become Pritam Da”, that’s how hilarious and confident the show is.

Cast: Masaba Gupta, Neena Gupta, Neil Bhoopalam, Rytasha Rathore.

Director: Sonam Nair

Streaming: Netflix


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